Revolution or evolution?

April 4, 2011 by Burke L.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

Review: What Else Works? Creative Work with Offenders: J. Brayford, F. Cowe and J Deering (eds) Willan Publishing; 2010; pp.290; {pound}22.99, pbk ISBN: 978–1– 84392–766– 2

April 4, 2011 by Taylor, E.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

Probation, Credibility and Justice

April 4, 2011 by McNeill, F.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

This article explores the difficulties that arise for probation agencies or those that deliver community sanctions in developing and maintaining their credibility in prevailing ‘late-modern’ social conditions. It begins by questioning the limits of the pursuit and promise of ‘public protection’ as a source of credibility, and then proceeds to examine the emergence of an alternative strategy — based principally on reparation and ‘payback’ — in Scotland, arguing that these Scottish developments have much to say to the emerging debates in England and Wales (and elsewhere) about the ‘rehabilitation revolution’ and the proper use of imprisonment. The article provides a critical account of the development and meaning of the Scottish version of ‘payback’, linking it to some important philosophical and empirical studies that may help to steer the development of payback away from a ‘merely punitive’ drift. In the conclusion, I argue that probation agencies and services need to engage much more deeply and urgently with their roles as justice services, rather than as ‘mere’ crime reduction agencies.

A new ‘Compendium of reoffending statistics and analysis’

April 4, 2011 by Fox, C.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

Re-education or recovery? Re-thinking some aspects of domestic violence perpetrator programmes

April 4, 2011 by Morran, D.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

There has been a substantial development of domestic violence perpetrator programmes within the probation service in recent years. Pressures to ensure that approaches are ‘evidence-based’ and thereafter formally ‘accredited’ have led to the proliferation of somewhat standardized models of intervention in both probation, and increasingly, in the voluntary sector. This does not fit either with the experience of practitioners nor from emerging research in this field. This article suggests that too much might be expected from current interventions. Consideration is then given to what individualized approaches might require in this context and specifically examines how desistance-focused approaches might apply with this type of ‘offender’.

In court

April 4, 2011 by Stone N.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

My Probation Career

April 4, 2011 by Gregory, M.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

This article charts one woman’s journey from unqualified care worker to Probation Officer and later to academic. It outlines the social, political and theoretical influences she encounters along the way from anti-psychiatry to behaviourism, feminism and the politics of Black power, as well as Marxism, reflective practice and the rise of punitive managerialism. It concludes with a brief outline of recent research which demonstrates that experienced practitioners use their abilities as reflective practitioners to enable them to practise in a way which is suffused with judgement and reflection upon the unique and particular circumstances of the person to be helped, and is not readily reduced to the straightforward application of technique.

Enhanced Thinking Skills evaluated

April 4, 2011 by Taylor, E.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

Delivering the Alcohol Treatment Requirement: Assessing the outcomes and impact of coercive treatment for alcohol misuse

Under the Criminal Justice Act (2003), Alcohol Treatment Requirements (ATRs) are now available and can be dispensed as part of a community sentence. ATRs deliver coercive treatment to predominantly ‘dependent’ drinkers specifically aiming to tackle levels of alcohol consumption and reduce alcohol related crime. Data gathered from probation records and treatment files for 81 offenders sentenced to treatment were analysed exploring offender characteristics, outcomes and impact. The analysis shows that those deemed ‘suitable’ and consequently sentenced for the ATR were primarily ‘white British’ males who had committed crimes related to ‘violence against the person’. Progression through treatment on the ATR is encouraging with a 70 per cent completion rate and positive outcomes with regard to levels of alcohol consumption. While re-offending rates were also low these should be viewed with caution as the time lapse between intervention and impact assessment was short.

Review: Offenders on Offending: Learning About Crime from Criminals: W. Bernasco (ed.) Willan Publishing; 2010; pp 322; {pound}25, pbk ISBN 978–1–84392–776–1

April 4, 2011 by Weaver, B.  
Filed under Getting Out of Jail

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