Maricopa County Court » Child Custody http://maricopacountycourt.net Sat, 18 Dec 2010 00:13:31 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.3 Being Smart and Sensitive About Child Custody Cases /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/being-smart-and-sensitive-about-child-custody-cases/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/being-smart-and-sensitive-about-child-custody-cases/#comments Fri, 03 Dec 2010 15:08:25 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=69434 By Kelly Scott M Leon -

When Child Custody Help is Necessary

Nobody wants to have to battle over their children. The fact is that having quarrels with the other parent of your kids can be quite agonizing to everyone else in your family. Grievously, having to fight is sometimes crucial. There are a variety of reasons for people to fight when it comes to custody issues. When they do, they affect many innocent people along their journey. How do you guard your kids while still trying to keep them under your wing? In this article we will give some tips about resources that you can look into to find help for your child custody issues.

One of the most vital things you need not forget when you are requesting child custody help is that you are an adult. Yelling, screaming and other forms of abuse will get you nowhere fast. Trying to get your children to take sides is a big no-no. Keep in mind that you are an adult and that throwing a fit is no longer beneficial for you if you are trying to get what you want. Be cordial. Don’t be childish. Don’t get mixed up with paltry issues. Now is going to be one of the heaviest moments in your life. Make sure you are showing all your positive qualities.

In some unfortunate cases, neither parent is awarded child custody. Sometimes child services will be awarded custody or the judge will find a family member for the child to go to, if the situation warrants it. The judge will determine that neither parent qualifies for sole custody, and is then forced to resort to this.

It is best to prepare yourself emotionally for this, even more so if your lawyer advises that this is an option.

Whether or not custody cases should go to court is an issue you will find both pros and cons for. The best way to help your self with your child custody case is to familiarize yourself with these.

Once the child is placed with the most qualified parent or guardian, a pro will be children who are safe and happy. Your child could be pulled through the battle, and if it is an ugly one, it could have negative affects on your child. Your lawyer will be your best resource for learning the pros and cons of pursuing a custody battle.

The reasons to seek child custody abound, and even more so if the law needs to get involved. Regardless of the situation you are in, knowledge is power. Learn the laws that your case will be tried under. If you want to win your case, you will need to be able to prove it. As always, keep your child’s interest at the forefront of your fight.

Healthy, happy and safe children should be what you are seeking, regardless of how that plays out.

Information provided by Tutordale.com

professional writer

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Divorce Law and Child Custody Leave Sleeping Tigers Alone /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/arizona-child-support-family-court-going-to-court/divorce-law-and-child-custody-leave-sleeping-tigers-alone/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/arizona-child-support-family-court-going-to-court/divorce-law-and-child-custody-leave-sleeping-tigers-alone/#comments Fri, 19 Nov 2010 17:09:46 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=68769 By Mark Allan Johnson -

The following is provided for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon in any manner before consulting with a licensed attorney in your state.

Divorce Law – Grab a Tiger by the Tail

Divorce law, particularly when children are involved, can be extremely acrimonious, and it affects me the most on a personal level due in part the lawyer becomes a therapist, too. I generally will not accept a case if the client’s goal is to take the other party to task on every infraction. For example, “S/he was a minute late dropping off the kids, I want you to file a contempt of court motion.” I made the mistake once of representing a good friend with his case, with a single child support matter taking two years to resolve and the parties were constantly trying to one-up the other.

I recently gave pro bono assistance to a father who I saw in family court representing himself. I met with him several times and gave advice on strategy and likely outcomes and the best way to approach his case. The best information I can convey sometimes is that the legal system is not about right or wrong but whether conduct is lawful and if a court can provide any relief to an aggrieved party. Other mantras I share are: you may never be vindicated, particularly in family court; bad things happen to good people, life isn’t always fair, mean people win sometimes; take the high road, live well and put this behind you as soon as possible.

The father I am helping finally heard and most importantly accepted what I had to say including, put down your sword and extend an olive branch of peace. He listened to my advice and let me know he has obtained what he wanted on an informal basis while his next court date is pending. He understands what he must accept and cannot control, as distasteful as it can be. He recently called to tell me he will continue his case on his own because he fears any change in the status quo will cause a contentious reaction and since he is making forward progress he does not want to risk going backwards.

I am so impressed by this gentleman who has already raised two children who are adults now and he is beside himself that he does not have the unfettered access to his two-year-old daughter that he had with his grown kids. He is of modest means and education but I am touched and moved by him each time we meet.

CAREFUL WHAT YOU WISH FOR

A court/judge has no interest in one’s personal affairs, of a civil nature, until people cannot resolve a dispute on their own. Divorcing parents are free to make whatever child custody arrangements they choose, for the most part, and the court only gets involved if the parents can’t agree.

Before I continue, its important to stress that parents can, and do, say any defamatory and untrue remark about the other with near impunity. Occasionally a judge may penalize a parent for making demonstrably untrue accusations, but this is the exception and not the rule and I have never heard of a judge referring a case to the district attorney for perjury charges despite most legal papers requiring a statement be executed under penalty of perjury. Individuals enjoy “judicial immunity” for all statements made in court papers and precludes a defamation lawsuit unless the untrue statements are published outside the ambit of the court papers. Judicial immunity extends to police investigations and reports, too.

The idea behind judicial immunity is that people must feel free to use and participate in the judicial process without fear of being sued for what they say. Though in extreme cases it might be possible to institute an action for malicious prosecution or abuse of process. A criminal case for false police report might be pursued, too, but good luck with that. Police agencies don’t like to be put in the middle and often suspect ulterior motives.

So now to the point of the section heading. After the fact, a parent came to me after filing a report of domestic violence/battery with the police and pursing a restraining order. The police investigated and the other parent denied and accused the reporting parent of abuse. The criminal case became a wash and the case rejected against both parents. The parent pursued the restraining order and cross allegations of abuse were made. The court issued mutual restraining orders and now they meet in a police lobby to accomplish the child custody exchange. They are refrained from contacting each other and once daily calls to the child when in the other parents care has ceased.

The moral of the story, and it is not always possible, do what you can to make peace. Think before you act, because steps to gain leverage even when legitimate can backfire and have severe consequences.

I recognize that attorney fees can mount very quickly particularly when he fees run from 200-350 an hour, and beyond the reach of many, however, family law is not a place for the faint of heart, uninformed, naive or idealistic. Most definitely, what you don’t know can and will hurt you.

Authored by California attorney Mark Johnson with offices in Palmdale, Oxnard, Rancho Cucamonga and Temecula, California. http://www.crimelaw.org

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How Child Support Works /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/arizona-child-support-family-court-going-to-court/how-child-support-works/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/arizona-child-support-family-court-going-to-court/how-child-support-works/#comments Wed, 17 Nov 2010 14:32:53 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=68649 By Zac Johnson -

If you have come to this article then I am sure you are curious as to how the process of obtaining child support works. This could because you are going through a divorce or are at least considering one. Going through a divorce is not an easy decision to make and should not be taken lightly. However understanding how the process works can give you a leg up on what you are about to experience.

How Child Support Works

When a couple decides to get a divorce it is understood that one of the parents will be given custody of the kids. However since one parent is given custody this does not stop the financial obligations the other parent has towards his or her children. The financial burden should be shared between both parents and the courts have enacted several provisions to enforce this. The determination of child support depends on how many children you have and how much the custodial parent makes. It is calculated differently depending upon where you live and even what jurisdiction you fall under.

The Calculation of Child Support

Each State calculates how much a non-custodial parent receives differently. This is mainly because each State has their own unique ways of gathering income and also many variations on living expenses. The State could appoint a economist to determine a families income streams and living conditions to determine the best outcome for the children. In some cases the custody of the children will be altered because one parent will be better able to take care of them financially

In most if not all states the requirement to have your children under some sort of health insurance is a must. If you cannot afford to have your children under your health insurance plan then you will need to appeal to the courts to see if you can get assistance with this.

If you are beginning to figure what you will need to take care of your children then there are many online child support calculators you can use to determine a good starting point. However I would like to point out that these are only just a tool to be used to start the negotiation process. It is best to use some sort of court appointed mediator as that will save you thousands in fees.

The process of obtaining child support is not an easy one. It can take months for the court to determine how much you can receive. This time can be very stressful to the other parent as they try to make ends meet.

Child custody battles are intense and without the proper aid can be almost impossible. Find the tools needed to win your battle for your kids.

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Family Law Attorney: Putting Your Life Back Together /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/family-law-attorney-putting-your-life-back-together/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/family-law-attorney-putting-your-life-back-together/#comments Fri, 12 Nov 2010 16:58:39 +0000 Maricopa County Court /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/family-law-attorney-putting-your-life-back-together/ By Abraham Avotina -

If you are in the middle of a bitter divorce, your most valuable and trustworthy supporter will probably end up being a qualified family law attorney. Whether you are fighting over child custody, splitting assets, child support or alimony payments, it is imperative that you have skilled legal counsel on your side. This can be a highly stressful and emotionally charged period of your life, making you unable to see all sides of the situation logically and calmly. Without a mediator, you may end up making some very rash decisions that can have a great impact on your future. A family law attorney can help you make important decisions and fight for your rights.

Child custody is often a very heated debate that can get extremely sour between two former spouses overnight. The court can order several different types of custody, usually when two spouses are on fairly good terms, joint custody is granted and the child or children spend an equal amount of time with each parent. These are generally straightforward cases that require little to no legal intervention. If you or your former partner, however, have a dispute over how custody should be shared, it is best to hire a family law attorney. However unfair or biased it may be, courts more often than not rule in favor of the female party. Any father fighting for rights for visitation or joint custody should not go to court unprepared or without proper representation. Custody terms can evolve over time as well. If you want to increase your visitation rights, a lawyer can help you return to court to review conditions.

Dividing assets and finances is often the most difficult part of any partnership dissolution. What starts off fairly amicably can turn ugly once grey areas start to arise or emotions come into play. After all, you can’t always put a price on a person’s sentimental value for something. A family law attorney can help you secure important assets and finances that rightfully belong to you, as well as help you negotiate when necessary. You’ll have to make some compromises, but your attorney can help organize your priorities and help you achieve your goals.

A lawyer is extremely helpful when it comes to negotiating and setting the terms for payments following a dissolution including alimony and child support. It is not uncommon for a slighted former partner to seek greater payments than necessary out of spite or simply out of greed. Often times, one partner may be saddled with a great financial burden that would be unnecessary if they had just had a skilled lawyer to help them fight their case. Alimony and child support is also generally not fixed. It can evolve or be eliminated as individual situations change over time, which makes it important to revisit the issue periodically with a family law attorney to ensure that the terms of payment are adjusted accordingly.

Do you need the help of a family law attorney in Mesa, AZ? This type of lawyer can help you defend your right to child custody. To learn more, please visit http://www.biddlelawmesa.com/

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Child Custody Schedules – Ideas for a 50-50 Custody Schedule /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-schedules-ideas-for-a-50-50-custody-schedule/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-schedules-ideas-for-a-50-50-custody-schedule/#comments Thu, 11 Nov 2010 15:46:45 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=68348 By Steven Carlson -

What are some common 50 50 child custody schedules, arrangements or parenting plans? There are many different 50/50 parenting schedules where the child spends an equal amount of time with each parent. The type of plan chosen and how the child spends time with each parent should reflect what’s best for the children and may vary from family to family depending on many factors such as the age of the children, relationship the child has with each parent, work schedules, distance between parent’s homes, etc. along with other family dynamics. Below are some common 50 50 child custody schedules the can be altered according to what works best for your children and your specific situation.

3-4-4-3 Parenting Schedule

One common 50 50 child custody schedule is a 3-4-4-3 schedule. An example of this parenting schedule is where the child spends time with parent A from Wednesday through Friday in Week One and Wednesday through Saturday Week Two. And the child would spend time with Parent B from Saturday through Tuesday in Week One and Sunday through Tuesday in Week Two.

This parenting schedule allows for the children to spend an equal amount of time with each parent and have frequent and continuous contact while not going without seeing either parent for more than four days. With this schedule the week day time is consistent between homes with only a few transitions throughout the month. This 50 50 child custody arrangement is more often seen in situations where the children are younger.

2-2-3-2-2-3 Parenting Schedule

Another common 50 50 child custody schedule is a 2-2-3-2-2-3 schedule. This parenting schedule is where the child spends Week One with Parent A on Monday and Tuesday (2 days), Parent B on Wednesday and Thursday (2 days) and the weekend with Parent A on Friday, Saturday and Sunday (3 days). The child spends Week Two with Parent B on Monday and Tuesday (2 days), Parent A on Wednesday and Thursday (2 days) and the weekend with Parent B on Friday, Saturday and Sunday (3 days)

This parenting schedule allows for the children to spend an equal amount of time with both parents during the week and on weekends. The parents will alternate weekends Friday-Sunday. The consistency of two consecutive day periods either Monday-Tuesday or Wednesday-Thursday will alternate from week-to-week. While there are a couple more transitions than the 5-2-2-5 schedule, the 2-2-3-2-2-3 schedule allows the child to spend an equal amount of time with both parents and have frequent and continuous contact with both parents, during the week and weekend, with the child not going more than three days without seeing either parent. This 50 50 child custody arrangement is more often seen in cases where the children are a little younger and spending more than three consecutive days with either parent is a concern or preferred.

5-2-2-5 Parenting Schedule

Another common 50 50 child custody schedule is a 5-2-2-5 schedule. This parenting schedule is where the child is with Parent A every Monday and Tuesday (2 days) and Parent B every Wednesday and Thursday (2 days). The weekends from Friday through Sunday would be alternated (3 days) between the parents. The child will be with the parent whose weekend it is for 5 days and the other parent 2 days. Because the weekend time alternates from week to week, the child would end up spending 50% time with both parents.

This parenting schedule allows for the children to spend an equal amount of time with both parents during the week and on weekends. It also affords the children to spend a longer block of time with each parent with only a few transitions between homes throughout the month. This 50 50 child custody arrangement is more often seen in cases where the children are a little bit older and can go without seeing either parent for five consecutive days.

Alternating Weeks Parenting Schedule

Another common 50 50 child custody arrangement is an alternating week schedule or “one week on and one week off” parenting schedule. This parenting schedule is where the child spends one week (7 days) with Parent A in Week One and one week (7 days) with Parent B in Week Two. This schedule is quite common and is more often seen in cases where the children are older and can go without seeing either parent for seven consecutive days.

A common modification of the alternating week schedule is to have a mid-week visit or overnight on Wednesday. In other words, the parent who the child is not with for a given week will have a dinner visit or overnight during the mid-week – typically on Wednesday. As the children grow older, they may be able to transition to a full alternating week parenting schedule. This parenting schedule is often seen in cases where the children are younger.

The alternating week parenting schedule allows the child to spend an equal 50% time with both parents during the week and weekend. It can also make for an easier and more consistent schedule transition during Winter, Spring and Summer break if the schedule remains the same or similar during the holidays.

2010 Child Custody Coach™. All rights reserved.

Child Custody Coach™ supplies information and one-on-one help to parents in the field of child custody and visitation issues, divorce, child custody evaluations, parenting and all divorce and custody related issues including child custody schedules. Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach™ is the author of the winning child custody guide “How to Win Child Custody: Proven Strategies that can Win You Custody & Save You Thousands in Attorney Costs!

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What You Need To Know About Child Custody Agreements /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/what-you-need-to-know-about-child-custody-agreements/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/what-you-need-to-know-about-child-custody-agreements/#comments Fri, 05 Nov 2010 15:50:38 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=68085 By Joshua Martindale -

If you think you know everything there is to know about child custody agreements, you have to think again. This is because these agreements are oftentimes more complicated than you can ever imagine, and there are several factors that family courts need to consider before they can decide on child custody agreements. However, there are basic details that you ought to know about how these procedures work. Here are some of the most important considerations.

First, you need to know that sole, legal, joint, and physical are the different custody types that parents are usually awarded in family courts. With sole custody, you get full custody of your child because the courts have ruled your spouse to be unfit for child custody. In these particular rulings, your spouse may have supervised visits, or no visits at all. It all depends on the court’s discretion.

Physical custody is when your spouse is awarded visitation while your child primarily lives with you. Legal custody, on the other hand, gives you the right to decide on your child’s behalf, for example on schooling issues, religion, or medical care. A joint custody is a set up where both you and your spouse are granted by the courts to simultaneously have custody of your child.

When a family court comes out with a decision, it considers different factors that are unique to your particular case. However, even while this is generally the case, what you can always expect is that the courts will try to come up with the best decision for the child’s situation.

Other important factors that a court considers include your social behaviors and lifestyle choices, physical and mental health, your child’s living pattern, the emotional bond that exists between you and your child, your capability to provide shelter, medical care, and clothing to your child, among other things. Moreover, depending on how old your child is, the court may allow your child to choose which parent he prefers to live with. This actually differs from state to state.

Child support is also one of the more important things to remember when it comes to child custody agreements. This is because the parent that is awarded the child’s full custody is also awarded child support as well. Moreover, the determination of how much the child support needs to be is done by the courts also. In the event that a parent fails to comply with what the court orders, they cannot be instantly denied their visitation rights, unless the court judge orders otherwise.

These are some of the things that you need to know about these types of custody agreements. Even though you cannot always be certain of how the courts will decide on certain cases, it still helps to know these basic considerations about this complex procedure.

Don’t risk the pain of losing custody of your child or getting minimal visitation rights. Next, discover the best custody arrangement and how you can virtually guarantee a win in your custody case. Don’t miss this: http://www.Child-Custody-Strategies.net.

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Child Custody Lawyer: Finding Yours /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-lawyer-finding-yours/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-lawyer-finding-yours/#comments Tue, 02 Nov 2010 16:20:09 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=67926 By Abraham Avotina -

The circumstances surrounding a child custody battle can be stressful, costly, and emotionally draining. By choosing the right lawyer to represent your case, you can avoid a large sum of added stress, while potentially making the difference between a full custody win, or every other weekend visitation. In this article, we will provide a few tips to help you in choosing your ideal child custody attorney.

Step 1 – Begin by skimming through the attorney section of your area yellow pages. This is the first step in finding someone to represent you in court. Start a list of attorneys in your area complete with all the necessary contact information. Make sure to choose those who specialize in family cases. Those who advertise bankruptcy and DUI cases are likely not well versed in the family law specifics you will require during your case.

Step 2 – Check in with your state bar association and ask in regard to recommended family law attorneys in your area. Compare the list you are provided with the list you’ve come up with through the yellow pages. While you are there, also make a point to ask in regard to any complaints that have been filed against the candidates you are considering.

Step 3 – Speak with close friends and family members to find out whether they have had to use a child custody lawyer in the past. In this way, you may be able to obtain additional recommendations along with accounts regarding the interaction, whether they were satisfied with the job that was done, and whether they would hire the attorney again, if they had to do the whole thing over.

Step 4 – Evaluate the list you’ve complied and choose the top three candidates whom you feel best suit the situation at hand. Contact each of them to schedule appointments. In most cases, you will be able to obtain an initial consultation free of charge.

Step 5 – Sit down and write out a list of questions to pose to each candidate during your initial meeting. Be prepared to discuss you’re the circumstances of your case in detail, and remember to include discussions pertaining to custody, visitation, support, insurance coverage, trust funds, and tax filings.

Step 6 – Bring a pad and paper to each consultation and take notes. Pay attention to how the lawyer interacts with you, and whether they appear friendly, professional, and interested in the specifics of the case. Be sure you’re dealing with someone who makes you feel confident in your case. Additionally, you will want to discuss payment options, and fees up front.

Step 7 – Once you’ve finished your set of meetings, sit down and compare the notes from each candidate. Decide which aspects are important to you, and go with the attorney who offers the ones that will benefit your situation. Avoid making a decision based solely on cost alone, as this may result in an attorney who is not quite as experienced or skilled as someone who charges a little more.

If you’re in need of legal assistance, Minneapolis lawyer can be your best guide. Contact: http://www.twincityaccidentlawyer.com

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Child Custody – When Can a Child Decide Which Parent to Live With? /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-when-can-a-child-decide-which-parent-to-live-with/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-when-can-a-child-decide-which-parent-to-live-with/#comments Tue, 26 Oct 2010 15:59:47 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=67660 By Steven Carlson -

There is typically no specific age when a child can decide which parent he/she wants to live with. It is generally up to the court or a judge to decide, not the child having to choose which parent to live with, if parents do not agree on custody and visitation and usually depends on the age and maturity of the child and specific circumstances of the case. Generally, the older and more mature the child is the more likely the court will listen to his/her wishes and the more weight given to his/her choice.

In California for example, if the child is determined by the court to be of “sufficient age and capacity to reason so as to form an intelligent preference as to custody, the court shall consider and give due weight to the wishes of the child in making an order granting or modifying custody” (California Family Code Section 3042(a)). The reasons for the child’s wishes will also be an important factor and should be heavily scrutinized.

Also, the court typically has discretionary authority and control over the examination of the child as a witness and can preclude him/her from being called as a witness by either party if the court finds calling the child as a witness would not be in his/her best interests. The court could and may dictate or provide indirect or a different means of obtaining information regarding the child’s preference on which parent to live with as an alternative so as to protect the child’s best interests and not make him/her directly part of the matter. Generally, putting a minor child in the middle of a child custody dispute by having to choose between his/her parents is something no court or judge wants to do.

The overall best interests of the child is the standard for custody determinations and modifications in California (California Family Code Section 3040) and generally the standard for most all states. The child’s preference is generally only one of many factors the court may take into consideration and weighed against all other factors in an order of preference to determine the overall best interest of the child. For legal advice about your situation and laws in your state regarding when can a child decide which parent to live with you’ll want to consult a child custody lawyer in your area.

2010 Child Custody Coach™. All rights reserved.

Child Custody Coach™ supplies information and one-on-one help to parents in the field of child custody and visitation issues, divorce, child custody evaluations, parenting and all divorce and custody related issues including a child’s custody preference. Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach™ is the author of the winning child custody guide “How to Win Child Custody: Proven Strategies that can Win You Custody & Save You Thousands in Attorney Costs!

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Child Custody Schedules – Ideas for a Holiday and Summer Custody Schedule /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-schedules-ideas-for-a-holiday-and-summer-custody-schedule/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-schedules-ideas-for-a-holiday-and-summer-custody-schedule/#comments Thu, 21 Oct 2010 14:05:47 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=67489 By Steven Carlson -

Child custody schedules often take into consideration non-school days such as 3-day weekends, thanksgiving recess, spring break, winter break, special holidays and summer recess. It is common for divorced parents to split the minor child’s non-school days even in situations where the parents do not have joint physical custody and do not share custody on an equal basis during the school year. In cases where there is clearly a custodial and noncustodial parent, sharing the holidays and breaks or non-school days allows both parents to have a meaningful relationship with frequent and continuous contact with their children even though the parents are divorced and may no longer live close to one another other.

There are many different holiday and summer child custody schedules that can be implemented that allows the minor child to spend an equal amount of time with each parent. Each situation is unique so the best holiday and summer parenting plan for one family may not be the best for another family. The holiday and summer custody schedule should reflect what’s best for the children and will typically take into consideration many factors including but not limited to the age of the children, relationship minor child has with each parent, work schedules, distance between parent’s homes and more. This article provides example holiday and summer child custody schedules which can be modified according to your situation and what would be in the best for your children.

50/50 Summer Break Schedule

It’s common for parents to share time with their children over the summer break. The summer holiday is usually the longest break during a school year. School breaks are often 5-8 weeks or 2-3 months between May and September. During the summer break parents can alternate weeks, alternate every two weeks, or continue with the regular schedule and add larger blocks of time for a vacation period with each parent.

50/50 Holiday Schedule

It’s also common for parents to share time with their children on holidays. A common holiday schedule is where one parent has the child in even-numbered years and the other parent has the child in odd-numbered years for a particular holiday. Some holidays such as Thanksgiving Break, Winter Break or Christmas Break, Spring Break may be split in half each year or alternate years between parents. This depends on the family and what works best for the children and family dynamic.

Other Special Days

While courts often provide parenting guidelines which outline common days or holidays observed, there really is no set standard as each family may celebrate different holidays or have special days they observe. Parents can be creative and include any day they mutually agree on such as the parent’s birthday, child’s birthday, Halloween, 4th of July, etc.

With a little thought and creativity one can come up with a child custody schedule that evenly divides holidays, special days, summer and non-school days between parents so the minor child can spend an equal amount of time with each parent. Each family is unique so the type of parenting plan chosen and how the child spends time with each parent may vary between homes but should ultimately reflect what’s best for the children and support and encourage a healthy and loving relationship with both parents.

2010 Child Custody Coach. All rights reserved.

Child Custody Coach supplies information and one-on-one help to parents in the field of child custody and visitation issues, divorce, child custody evaluations, parenting and all divorce and custody related issues including child custody schedules. Steven Carlson, The Custody Coach is the author of the winning child custody guide “How to Win Child Custody: Proven Strategies that can Win You Custody & Save You Thousands in Attorney Costs!

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Child Visitation Agreement Enforcement /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-visitation-agreement-enforcement/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-visitation-agreement-enforcement/#comments Wed, 13 Oct 2010 15:02:16 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=67196 By James Witherspoon -

In order to maintain the legitimacy of divorce court proceedings, the law is prepared to enforce any violations of settled agreements. In particular, issues involving children can be among the most debated and contentious areas of a divorce, causing an otherwise calm divorce process to become nothing short of nightmarish. When the final arrangements are made by the court, those parties involved must follow the law in regards to these orders or they may face significant legal repercussions.

Custody and visitation agreements are considered legally binding arrangements in the eyes of the law, making any violations potential criminal offenses. Although this is true, civil damages are usually pressed, including punitive changes to the existing custody arrangements and / or monetary damages for suffering.

Criminally, the charges can vary according to the severity of the arrangement violations. In the most extreme situations, a parent may take a child and leave, failing to inform anyone of their location or intention. These circumstances may qualify for certain kidnapping charges or unlawful imprisonment, which carry prison sentences or serious probationary periods. Lesser charges associated with a failure to adhere to court-ordered custody arrangements include procedural violations. Repeated violations may lead to a person being held in contempt of court.

Generally speaking, the most common and immediate penalties for a breach of custody agreements involve parents being reduced or cut out of custodial agreements altogether. If a parent wishes to spend more time with their children, the court offers several methods to modify visitation or custody agreements for those willing to work within the system.

For more information regarding the rights of a parent in terms of custody enforcement, contact a divorce attorney.

If you need help enforcing a child custody arrangement, contact the Austin divorce attorneys of Slater Kennon & Jameson, LLP today.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=James_Witherspoon
http://EzineArticles.com/?Child-Visitation-Agreement-Enforcement&id=5174562

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