Child Custody Court – Being Prepared

September 2, 2010 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under Child Custody, Family Court

By Alan Katz -

Before going to your first child custody court hearing it is a good idea to prepare yourself mentally and emotionally for what may be quite an exhausting and stressful experience. If you have a court hearing scheduled already you are probably experiencing a fair amount of anxiety by now. One of the most important things to remember is to keep your cool at all costs. You do not want to walk into the court room looking like a basket case, as this will do absolutely nothing to help your position. Rather than considering strategies in which you can attack the opposition, it is a much better idea to consider ways in which you can make yourself favorable in the court’s eyes.

One of the things you may want to do is obtain letters of character reference from various sources. If you already have custody of your children and you are the one being sued, you may want to provide documentation from your child’s teachers, or other school officials, about your performance as a parent who is active in your child’s life. It may also be helpful to obtain a letter from your employer and landlord/mortgage holder. These things can help the child custody court determine your stability.

While you do not want to attack the opposition, you should also remember to include any documentation surrounding any allegations of abuse or neglect on their part. It is critical that any claims you are making against the character of the parent you are battling should be backed up with solid proof. Remember that child custody courts deal in facts and evidence so make sure you provide as much documentation you can surrounding any claims of wrong doing, including photographs, witnesses, or any other type of evidence you may have.

Don’t risk the pain of losing custody of your child or getting minimal visitation rights by not knowing the rules of child custody court.

Next, discover the best custody arrangement and how you can virtually guarantee a win in your custody case. Visit my site at www.Child-Custody-Strategies.net

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Alan_Katz
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Family Court – Being Prepared For Your Child Custody Case

February 23, 2010 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under Child Custody, Family Court

How confident do you feel about your upcoming family court date? Are you ready to walk in and present a well prepared and documented child custody agreement to the judge? Or are you nervous and not quite sure what to expect? The key to feeling confident about appearing in family and custody court is preparation. If you are prepared, you don’t need to worry. That preparation will shine through in the courtroom and the judge will be more likely to incorporate your custody plan. Here are three suggestions for preparing for the big day.

1. Be on your best behavior. The court is going to discuss how you’ve been behaving during your custody situation. If you are uncooperative and not communicating with your spouse about what you’re doing with the children it makes you look bad. It is normal to feel some anger and resentment at your ex spouse–but you shouldn’t take out that anger with the child custody issues. Communicate with your spouse and let them know when you’ll be bringing the kids back, or dropping them off, or picking them up. And, follow through on what you say. If your spouse has multiple incidences of you saying one thing about the kids and doing another they will bring it up–and the judge won’t look on that favorably. Cooperate with your spouse, support your kids, and be reliable.

2. Come up with a well thought out plan. The judge in family and custody court will be impressed if you have a well thought out plan. Come up with the custody agreement that you’d like the court to accept. Make your agreement fair and in the best interest of the child. Divide the holidays equally between you and your spouse, come up with the basic schedule of custody, and decide how you will make joint, or shared, custody work if that is what you want. You should also think through any additional provisions that you want in your custody agreement. Do you want to be informed if your ex gets your child a passport? Do you want to ban negative talk about the other parent around the child? Put it in the agreement. The fact that you spent so much time creating your custom agreement shows the court that you are putting your child as your first priority. If you want some help creating your custody agreement, you may want to look into purchasing some child custody software. There are some programs out there that let you easily create and print a calendar, and also allow you print out your agreement with any provisions you want.

3. Bring documents. Once you’ve created your child custody agreement, print the documents and bring multiple copies to court. You will be able to impress the judge when you hand him/her a copy of the year long calendar you created, plus a typed list of provisions, and a calculated time share. This shows that you really did your homework and it will also help you to present your agreement. If you are using a child custody software to help you prepare your documents you should be able to print multiple copies with no problems.

You have enough to stress about without the additional worry of appearing in family court for your child custody. Work hard before and get prepared so that your day in court goes smoothly and stress-free.

Learn more about getting ready for family court and preparing your perfect child custody agreement.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chloe_Nelsun

Family Court – Being Prepared For Your Child Custody Case

February 7, 2010 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under Uncategorized

By Chloe Nelsun -

How confident do you feel about your upcoming family court date? Are you ready to walk in and present a well prepared and documented child custody agreement to the judge? Or are you nervous and not quite sure what to expect? The key to feeling confident about appearing in family and custody court is preparation. If you are prepared, you don’t need to worry. That preparation will shine through in the courtroom and the judge will be more likely to incorporate your custody plan.

Here are three suggestions for preparing for the big day.

1. Be on your best behavior. The court is going to discuss how you’ve been behaving during your custody situation. If you are uncooperative and not communicating with your spouse about what you’re doing with the children it makes you look bad. It is normal to feel some anger and resentment at your ex spouse–but you shouldn’t take out that anger with the child custody issues. Communicate with your spouse and let them know when you’ll be bringing the kids back, or dropping them off, or picking them up. And, follow through on what you say. If your spouse has multiple incidences of you saying one thing about the kids and doing another they will bring it up–and the judge won’t look on that favorably. Cooperate with your spouse, support your kids, and be reliable.

2. Come up with a well thought out plan. The judge in family and custody court will be impressed if you have a well thought out plan. Come up with the custody agreement that you’d like the court to accept. Make your agreement fair and in the best interest of the child. Divide the holidays equally between you and your spouse, come up with the basic schedule of custody, and decide how you will make joint, or shared, custody work if that is what you want. You should also think through any additional provisions that you want in your custody agreement.

Do you want to be informed if your ex gets your child a passport? Do you want to ban negative talk about the other parent around the child? Put it in the agreement. The fact that you spent so much time creating your custom agreement shows the court that you are putting your child as your first priority. If you want some help creating your custody agreement, you may want to look into purchasing some child custody software. There are some programs out there that let you easily create and print a calendar, and also allow you print out your agreement with any provisions you want.

3. Bring documents. Once you’ve created your child custody agreement, print the documents and bring multiple copies to court. You will be able to impress the judge when you hand him/her a copy of the year long calendar you created, plus a typed list of provisions, and a calculated time share. This shows that you really did your homework and it will also help you to present your agreement. If you are using a child custody software to help you prepare your documents you should be able to print multiple copies with no problems. You have enough to stress about without the additional worry of appearing in family court for your child custody. Work hard before and get prepared so that your day in court goes smoothly and stress-free. Learn more about getting ready for []family court and preparing your perfect child custody agreement. Article Source: Family Court – Being Prepared For Your Child Custody Case

Mum, I’m Having a Baby

By Wendy Streater –

These can be the most rewarding and exciting words you can hear from your child but sometimes these words can come as a surprise. The best thing you can do is support your child.

If the news is an unexpected surprise, your child is probably a little worried about your reaction and will really need your reassurance now.

Even if it’s an anxiously awaited announcement, your child will probably be a little scared about their new responsibilities. It is pretty scary suddenly finding you are about to be a parent for the first time. Remember your own concerns. They turned out to be mostly unfounded but it is normal to be a little worried. Your child and their partner will need a lot of quiet support and maybe the occasional piece of advice.

The first thing to do, after you have congratulated them of course, is to find out if they want you to tell anyone. Some couples like to wait until the mother is starting to show before they announce the happy event. Some just want immediate family to know. Some couples would be insulted if you didn’t announce it to the world. Find out what they want and please abide by their wishes. They will be upset if you don’t and now is not the time to cause friction in the family.

Be happy for the expectant couple and don’t worry yourself or them with talk of finances, buying a house or anything like that. They are adults and have to work it out for themselves. The best thing you can do for them is to let them know you are there if they need you. If they come to you for advice, tell them what you would do and let them know you won’t be offended if they choose another path.

You might want to find out if they want gifts. Some new parents are happy to receive clothes, toys and furniture, while some prefer to buy their own. If you wish to make large purchases like furniture, it might be a good idea to find out if they have a particular decorating plan. Some young parents accept gifts to be polite but would prefer another style or colour while some will tell you straight out they want a different style. To save embarrassment or offence it is safer to ask. A gift registry is a good solution for some.

The most important thing is to enjoy yourself. It’s not every day you get to be a grandparent for the first time. By the way, do you want to be Granny, Grandma or Nanna?

Wendy Streater is about to become a Grandmother. Her site http://www.newgranny.info is devoted to new grandparents everywhere. Visit the site for ideas or advice and feel free to add advice, ideas or information of your own to the blog page http://www.newgranny.info/blog

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Wendy_Streater

Child Custody Court – Preparing Your Visitation Plan

June 17, 2009 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under Family Court

By Chloe Nelsun -

In order to be successful in child custody court, it is vital to have a solid visitation plan prepared. While you are making your child visitation plan, there are certain key elements to consider. These include thinking about the calendar schedule you’d like to have, the holiday schedule, and any vacation time or special events. If you think these issues through then your court day will go well.

The basic schedule you want to have for custody is the basis for your calendar. Pick a schedule that works for your situation. Maybe you are trying a shared parenting plan and the time is split between the parents. You may want to try alternating weeks. You can also have a schedule where one parent has the kids on the weekends and the other parent has them during the week. Or every other weekend. Or the second and fourth weekend. You can also add extra visiting days in the week–these can be evening or overnight visits. Make a calendar of your basic schedule for at least a year–this allows you to have the visual picture you need to see how much time you have with the kids.

Once you have the schedule set out for a year, come up with your holiday schedule. For the holiday schedule you need to decide what holidays the child spends with what parent and how long the holiday lasts. You should divide the big holidays–Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, etc–evenly between the parents. You also need to determine if the holiday time goes for several days, or if the day is split between the parents. Generally you swap the holiday schedule every year–so if you don’t have the kids for Thanksgiving this year, you can have them next year.

Another part of the holiday schedule is to think about the times when the kids schedule changes–like spring and summer break. Since the children don’t need as much stability during the breaks, there can be a break from the routine custody. You can schedule more visitation days during these times.

You can also consider if there will be any periods of the year where there will be special events–either one time or recurring. A one time event might be the child spending the day with the parent on the parent’s birthday. Recurring special events could be the games for a sporting event or anything else that the child is involved with that the other parent will participate in. Mark these in your calendar.

If you go to the work of preparing a good parenting plan that is in the best interest of your child, you don’t need to worry about custody court. You will impress everyone with your calendar and the custody and visitation schedule that you’ve set up. Thinking about the basic schedule that you want, the holiday schedule, and the special events will get you on the right track.

Learn how to be prepared for child custody court and get more information about child visitation.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chloe_Nelsun

Child Custody Court and Custody Laws

June 12, 2009 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under Uncategorized

By Caleb Jonsun -

It is a common element in all custody laws to seek for the child’s best interest. But what exactly is best for the child?  Who can tell what is best for a child?

In all child custody disputes the ultimate goal is to provide for the support and education of the minor children after a divorce or separation. A divorce or a separation does not end the parents’ duties towards their minor children.  Parents have the duty to provide for the support and education of their minor children even after a separation or a divorce.  Back in the early 18th Century, gender was the factor to resolve a child custody controversy.  Today, the parent’s gender is no longer the key factor when awarding child custody and visitation rights. The fact is that today there is no such thing as a key factor when deciding child custody cases.  The current tendency is for courts to look at child custody controversy on a case by case basis.  There are many factors to be considered.

Most people believe that the financial situation of each parent is more likely to be a determining factor when deciding child custody cases today.  However, at least in theory, this is not completely correct.  The child’s relationship with each parent, siblings, and other family relatives, the time the parent will spend with the minor, the reliance the minor has on the parent, the circumstances of the parent’s place of residence and many other aspects are taken into consideration by judges when awarding child custody and visitation rights.  Upon considering all these factors, both parents are to be given the same consideration.  Nevertheless, in cases in which the child is able to communicate a preference, his or her wishes must also be taken into account.  This does not apply to young children, generally to children ten years of age or more.  The older the child is, the more weight will the judge give to his or her preference when determining what parent is going to be awarded with the child’s custody.  The child’s preference, however cannot be the only factor taken into account.

The child’s best interest may be an expression apparently open to many interpretations.  Through the years, family law courts have incorporated different measures to base this determination of facts, rather that on preconceptions, biases or prejudices.  Less and less discretion is being given to the judges as new child custody laws are enacted and milestone cases precedents become public.

Family courts today provide a procedure that include a social investigation as part of any contested divorce or separation case.  This investigation, usually conducted by a social worker, involves a study of every circumstance related to the child’s way of life.  In some cases, the court may order a psychological evaluation of the child and or the parents.  In addition, family courts today have the authority to request from the litigants a complete disclosure of their finances under oath.  These are some of the measures incorporated through time to the divorce and child custody cases to ensure the primary goal: to ensure the protection of the child’s best interests.

Learn how to prepare for custody court and find out about the child custody laws that will impact your case.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Caleb_Jonsun

Child Custody Court – Preparing Your Visitation Plan

By Chloe Nelsun -

In order to be successful in child custody court, it is vital to have a solid visitation plan prepared. While you are making your child visitation plan, there are certain key elements to consider. These include thinking about the calendar schedule you’d like to have, the holiday schedule, and any vacation time or special events. If you think these issues through then your court day will go well.

The basic schedule you want to have for custody is the basis for your calendar. Pick a schedule that works for your situation. Maybe you are trying a shared parenting plan and the time is split between the parents. You may want to try alternating weeks. You can also have a schedule where one parent has the kids on the weekends and the other parent has them during the week. Or every other weekend. Or the second and fourth weekend. You can also add extra visiting days in the week–these can be evening or overnight visits. Make a calendar of your basic schedule for at least a year–this allows you to have the visual picture you need to see how much time you have with the kids.

Once you have the schedule set out for a year, come up with your holiday schedule. For the holiday schedule you need to decide what holidays the child spends with what parent and how long the holiday lasts. You should divide the big holidays–Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, etc–evenly between the parents. You also need to determine if the holiday time goes for several days, or if the day is split between the parents. Generally you swap the holiday schedule every year–so if you don’t have the kids for Thanksgiving this year, you can have them next year.

Another part of the holiday schedule is to think about the times when the kids schedule changes–like spring and summer break. Since the children don’t need as much stability during the breaks, there can be a break from the routine custody. You can schedule more visitation days during these times.

You can also consider if there will be any periods of the year where there will be special events–either one time or recurring. A one time event might be the child spending the day with the parent on the parent’s birthday. Recurring special events could be the games for a sporting event or anything else that the child is involved with that the other parent will participate in. Mark these in your calendar.

If you go to the work of preparing a good parenting plan that is in the best interest of your child, you don’t need to worry about custody court. You will impress everyone with your calendar and the custody and visitation schedule that you’ve set up. Thinking about the basic schedule that you want, the holiday schedule, and the special events will get you on the right track.

Learn how to be prepared for child custody court and get more information about child visitation.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chloe_Nelsun

Child Custody Court – Common Questions and Answers

By Chloe Nelsun -

Many divorced parents are understandably nervous about going to child custody court. This is the place where a judge could determine the future of your parenting time–so of course parents are going to be nervous! The best way to deal with the anxiety that going to family court brings is to have as much information about it as possible. Here are some common questions and answers that come up about child custody court.

1. Who goes to custody court? This depends on the state you live. In some places, every divorced parent must at least appear in court. In others you can handle things through mediation and sidestep the courtroom. Anyone who has a custody dispute can go to family court–that includes parents who were never married, and grandparents who want to spend time with their grandchildren.

2. What decisions does the custody court make? This depends on what you bring to the court. If parents are able to sit down and come up with a child custody agreement then the court will just accept it–and in some states if parents can agree on an arrangement they don’t even need to go to court. In other states they just need to make the appearance. If parents are not able to agree on their custody situation then the judge will decide on the agreement and the issues about custody.

3. What factors does the court consider when deciding child custody cases? The basic rule for the family court when deciding custody cases is to do what is in the best interest of the child. They’ll consider such questions as who is the child’s primary caretaker, who is able to provide a stable living environment, if there are any factors in either parent’s life that would negatively affect the child. The court only considers live-in relationships or non-marital sexual relations if they affect the child. The judge may also decide to talk to the child to find out what the child wants. Generally the judge will talk to the child in private.

4. Does a judge or a jury preside at custody court? Usually a single judge presides at the court, however, either parent has the right to request a jury.

5. What can I do to show the judge that I’m a responsible parent? The court looks favorably on parents who try to cooperate to support their kids. In the time before the court, make sure that you always let your spouse know what you are doing with the kids and the times you’ll drop them off or pick them up. Be reliable. If you’re not, it will come up in court.

You want custody court to be a positive experience in your life–so it is important that you learn as much as you can about it before you go. The more information you have about family court, the more prepared you can be to make a favorable impression, and then get a child custody situation that you like.

Learn more about preparing for child custody court and get more child custody information.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chloe_Nelsun

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