Maricopa County Court » child custody agreement http://maricopacountycourt.net Sat, 18 Dec 2010 01:07:20 +0000 en hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.3 Child Custody Agreement And What Parents Should Know /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-agreement-and-what-parents-should-know/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-agreement-and-what-parents-should-know/#comments Tue, 12 Oct 2010 14:34:29 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=67165 By Muhammad Suhail -

Ending a relationship with divorce can be worst for a couple but it can be even harder for the child who is there to make the relationship stronger. Any kind of separation that involves a child would lead to a custody fight and a subsequent child custody agreement.

Most of the times, parents mutually agree to chalk out a child custody agreement. Most commonly, the child custody agreement would detail things such as child visits, living arrangements and conditions, who would be the legal decision maker and meeting with friends and family. A child custody agreement in most cases is informal, and is part of an out of court settlement, keeping the best interests of the child in mind.

There is no doubt that in a divorce children are most affected. They not only get scarred emotionally, but they are psychologically jolted for life. In order for the child to be least affected, parents should make the divorce as friendly as possible. This might not sound ideal but it is vital for the mental health of the child. During any agreement, the interests of the child should be held paramount. Everything in the agreement should be finalized by keeping the best interest of the child.

Before starting to give the agreement a shape, it is recommended for both parents to have a look at their individual child custody rights. These rights can be easily found on the internet or your lawyer would hand over them to you. Understanding these rights is extremely important before any child custody agreement is put in place. Most of the custody agreements are penned after several lengthy discussions between the parents and their respective lawyers. Custody agreements that are usually presented in the court are born after realistic and fair discussions.

A court keeps the best interest of the child at heart in any agreement. It judges what happens to the child after the parents are separated. The court sees the following points in an agreement keeping the child’s interest at heart.

• Any sort of former history of abuse or violence involving the child

• The age of the child and the medical condition or current health

• School and community ties of the child

• Emotional ties to any of the parent

• The parents and their capacity to provide for the child financially

• Social life of the parent

• Finally, the choice of the child

During an agreement, the kinds of custody are also discussed. The physical custody and the legal custody are two of the most common. The major types of agreements that can take place between the parents include joint custody, shared custody, and primary physical and split custody. During the agreement, the parents and the court can decide on which type of custody they want.

Parents find it often difficult to agree on any sort of child custody agreement. If and only if they keep the safety of the child in mind and make every effort to make the separation amicable, then reaching an agreement on child custody can be easy.

For advice on child custody agreement and get details about child custody, visit our site ObainCustody.

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Child Custody Modifications /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-modifications/ /maricopa-county-courts/family-court/child-custody-modifications/#comments Mon, 04 Oct 2010 13:50:10 +0000 Maricopa County Court /?p=66876 By David S Caldwell -

It is not uncommon that when a child custody case is decided that it may need adjustment in the future. Even after a long period of time in which the child custody agreement has worked out well, a major change in the child or parent’s life may spark a need for a change in the custody agreement.

In applying for modifications, a divorced individual will mostly likely hire a child custody attorney. Seeing as how even the initial process of settling on custody can be difficult, modifying a court order agreement successfully will be greatly aided by an experienced attorney.

Applying for Modifications

There are several factors that legal professionals will look at when deciding whether or not to modify a custody agreement. If something in the agreement is not working then there is at least one party who would like to make changes.

The protection of a child’s mental and physical health is of the utmost importance when a judge reviews a case. If abuse has occurred, this will result in a fast change to the arrangements.

If a parent has been proven to be unfit to take care of a child due to physical or mental illness, a new agreement can be reached.

If a parent is moving a long distance, this will also necessitate a change to the custody agreement. A change of income may also affect how a judge looks at the ability of a parent to provide the financial resources necessary to raise a child.

If a parent has not complied with the previous agreement, it will most likely hurt his or her case if he or she is trying to make changes that he or she will benefit from. It is important for individuals to follow the rules set forth by the custody agreement, otherwise they may lose their privileges or may face further legal action.

If you have questions regarding making modifications to a child custody agreement, please visit the website of the San Diego child custody attorneys of Fischer & Van Thiel, LLP.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_S_Caldwell
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