Arizona DUI Penalties

September 18, 2008 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under DUI

By Michael Tasner

The penalties for DUI in Arizona depend on the severity of the offense and any prior offenses accrued. These penalties can include jail time, fines, and other penalties designed to prevent any repeat offenses. The penalties for a first DUI offense with a blood alcohol of more than 0.08% and less than 0.15% are as follows:

• 10 days in jail; 9 days may be suspended if you agree to substance abuse treatment

• 90 day license suspension

• $250.00 fine and processing fee; $500 assessment cost for arrests after 3/13/04

• Counseling if 9 days in jail are to be suspended

• Probation of up to 5 years

The penalties for a first offense with a blood alcohol level of 0.15% or greater are more severe. These penalties include:

• 30 days in jail; 20 days may be suspended if you agree to substance abuse treatment

• $500 in fines, surcharges, and assessment costs; $2,000 if arrested after 3/13/04

• 90 day license suspension

• Counseling if 20 days in jail are to be suspended

• Probation of up to 5 years

• Installation of ignition interlock advice on your vehicle

Additional offenses within a five year period make the penalties for DUI even more severe. For a second offense with a blood alcohol level of 0.08% and 0.15%, the penalties are as follows:
• 90 days in jail; 60 days may be suspended if you agree to substance abuse treatment

• $750 in fines and costs; $2,000 for arrests after 3/13/04

• One year license revocation

• Counseling if 60 days in jail are to be suspended

• Installation of ignition interlock device on your vehicle

• Probation of up to 5 years

Second offense extreme DUI charges carry possible penalties as follows:

• 120 days in jail; 60 days may be suspended if you agree to substance abuse treatment

• $750 in fines and costs; $2,000 if arrested after 3/13/04

• One year license revocation

• Counseling if 60 days in jail are to be suspended

• Probation of up to 5 years

• Installation of ignition interlock device on your vehicle

Third offenses carry even harsher penalties for repeat offenders. The penalties for a third DUI offense include:

• Mandatory four months in prison before probation or other release can be considered

• Up to $150,000 in fines, $250 assessment cost, and $1,500 cost for arrest after 3/13/04

• Three year license revocation

• Counseling upon commencement of probation

• Probation of up to 5 years

• Forfeiture of the vehicle you were driving at the time of the offense if you owned it

Transporting someone under the age of 15 in a vehicle while committing a DUI offense carries more severe penalties. These penalties include:

• Serving the minimum prison sentence you would have served for the offense had a
person under the age of 15 not been in the vehicle
• Up to $150,000 in fines, $250 assessment cost, and $1,500 cost for arrests after 3/13/04

• Three year license revocation

• Counseling upon commencement of probation

• Possible vehicle forfeiture if you owned the vehicle you were driving

All of these penalties have the potential to impact your life forever. A criminal conviction will make it difficult to obtain employment and having a license revocation due to DUI may cause you to be dropped by your auto insurance company or have your rates go through the roof. Your best chance for fighting DUI charges is to contact an Arizona DUI attorney who can guide you through your case and use his or her knowledge and trial experience to obtain the best possible outcome.

Fill out a free case evaluation to contact a [http://www.dui-attorney-search.com/states_pages/AZ.htm]Arizona DUI Attorney today!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Tasner http://EzineArticles.com/?Arizona-DUI-Penalties&id=407449

Arizona’s New DUI Laws

September 18, 2008 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under DUI

By Shelley Cantrelle

Thanks to Arizona’s new drunk driving laws, even first time offenders could land themselves in prison. Effective October 2007, the state’s driving under the influence (DUI) laws are recognized as the harshest in the nation.

Although Governor Janet Napolitano signed the bill into law after it was approved overwhelmingly in the House and Senate. However, it was met with some resistance. Opponents felt it unfairly penalized those who were otherwise responsible citizens.

One of the most significant changes is the mandatory 45 day jail sentence for first timers that are found to have a blood alcohol level of twice the legal limit or higher. The current limit is .08%. The new laws classify them as “super extreme” offenders when chemical tests reveal a blood alcohol concentration, or BAC, of .20% or more. Incidentally, refusing to submit to the test, whether convicted or not, results in an automatic one year license suspension.

As tough as that seems, jail time is only the beginning. The newly convicted “super extreme” drunk drivers will be required to install an ignition interlock device in their vehicle. At one time, only repeat offenders were required to have it installed.

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, this mandatory piece of equipment is designed to connect a breath analyzer to a motor vehicle’s ignition system.

The ignition interlock system, referred to as an IID, will only allow the vehicle to start if the monitor shows the blood alcohol concentration to be below a predetermined and preset level. The ignition is simply disabled if the reading exceeds the specified number.

The IID must be installed and in use for a minimum of twelve months after the DUI conviction and judges have no authority to waive or reduce that period of time. They can, however, order additional time for the device to remain in use.

Because the penalties are so stiff, Arizona attorneys are gearing up to defend more first time offenders in court. Prior to last year, clients didn’t necessarily face jail time, especially for a first offense. They were usually told to expect warnings, fines and probation, or what amounted to little more than a slap on the wrist. Now they expect many will want to present a challenge rather than automatically plead guilty or no contest.

The new law is also written to expedite the whole DUI process for law enforcement. It allows the Motor Vehicle Department to examine their own records for previous DUI offenses. Rather than waiting for the courts to send them, they can now effectively cut through the red tape and reduce turnaround time.

It’s a sobering thought for many Arizona residents and rightfully so. In 2006, there were 315 lives lost and over 59,000 injuries as a result of alcohol related crashes. The economic loss is estimated at upwards of $547 million. Those statistics and the new laws should make anyone think twice before driving and drinking.

Source: http://www.azdot.gov

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Shelley_Cantrelle http://EzineArticles.com/?Arizonas-New-DUI-Laws&id=1280824

Arizona DUI Penalties

September 16, 2008 by Maricopa County Court  
Filed under DUI

By Alison Cole

DUI penalties refer to laws pertaining to criminal punishment while “Driving Under the Influence” or drunk driving. It also extends to DWI (Driving While Intoxicated/Driving While Impaired), either due to the influence of alcohol or drugs. In Arizona, DWI is a more common offense than DUI. The penalty for a suspect convicted of the offense depends largely on the seriousness of the charge and the prior criminal record.

DUI is confirmed by either the sobriety tests or an estimation of the blood alcohol levels. The penalties depend on the DUI laws in specific states and some are extremely harsh and complex. A first-time offense incites a jail term, fines, restrictions/suspensions of license, installation of ignition interlock devices, vehicle confiscation, and probation periods. With an increase in the number of offenses over time, the penalties are “enhanced,” and a fourth time offender is convicted as a Class E Felon and sentenced to one to six years of imprisonment.

Possession of a driving license automatically implies the consent of the driver to agree to chemical tests that determine sobriety. However, a driver can refuse to abide by the “Implied Consent Law.” This violation has serious consequences during the court proceedings, since it prompts suspicion of intoxication. In some states, the refusal to cooperate itself is considered as a separate offense that results in the suspension of the license for a term or adds jail time to the pronounced sentence.

Cases have been reported where commercial agencies refused vehicles for hire to a convicted person and insurance companies cancelled their policies. DUI/DWI is considered so serious an offense that a single instance affects the individual in several ways throughout the lifetime. [http://www.e-ArizonaDUILawyers.com]Arizona DUI Lawyers provides detailed information on Arizona DUI Lawyers, Arizona DUI Arrests, Arizona DUI Penalties, Arizona DUI Records and more. Arizona DUI Lawyers is affiliated with [http://www.e-ArizonaDUIAttorneys.com]Arizona DUI Defense.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Alison_Cole http://EzineArticles.com/?Arizona-DUI-Penalties&id=222343

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